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PM Koirala addresses UN Climate Summit

  

Courtesy: PM's Secretariat

Prime Minister Sushil Koirala along with the Nepali delegates poses for photograph before addressing the opening ceremony of UN Climate Summit 2014 in New York, on Tuesday, September 23, 2014.

THT ONLINE

KATHMANDU: Prime Minsiter Sushil Koirala addressed the National Action and Ambition Announcement Plenary 2 of the United Nations Climate Summit 2014, at the UN Trusteeship Council Chamber in New York today.

Highlighting the effects of global warming and climate change, he said commitments must be translated into concrete actions based on the accepted principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, equity and respective capability.

“Given the enormity of environmental challenges and severity of climate change crisis, it is time to recognise grave threats in this interdependent and interconnected world, demonstrate bold leadership, and develop a comprehensive plan to galvanise grassroots movement along with international actions by global partners to build a binding climate change agreement by 2015 for climate solutions,” he stated.

On the occasion, he mentioned that Nepal has adopted a climate change policy and shed light on the focused programmes that the country has implmented.

“We recognise that an appropriate level of carbon pricing is necessary to enhance the prospects of REDD-plus in carbon stocking, and more vigorously promote the clean development mechanism,” he said.








Prime Minister Sushil Koirala addresses the National Action and Ambition Announcement Plenary 2 of UN Climate Summit 2014. Photo: PM's Secretariat






Prime Minister Sushil Koirala (right) taking part in the UN Climate Summit 2014. Courtesy: PM's Secretariat

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Prime Minister Sushil Koirala's statement





Mr. President

Mr. Secretary-General

Distinguished Delegates

I thank the UN Secretary-General for organizing this important Summit, and deeply acknowledge his leading efforts to address the issue of climate change.

Global warming has put the mountains on hotspot of climate change. Nepal is bearing disproportionate effects of this menace, making it the fifth most vulnerable country in terms of climate change. The melting of Himalayan glaciers has seriously affected the hydrological stability of the river system, and caused erratic and extreme weather events leading to flash floods and landslides, loss of biodiversity, decline in agricultural productivity, and depletion of fresh water resources. This has threatened the livelihoods of over 1.2 billion people, and made the region fragile and unstable with widespread implications far beyond.

Nepal has adopted a climate change policy containing a National Adaptation Programme of Action, a Local Adaptation Plan of Action, and with institutionalized structures like Climate Change Council which I personally chair. Other focused programmes include the Rastrapati Chure Terai Madhesh Conservation and declaration of 2014-24 as forest decade committing to maintain 40 percent of our land under uninterrupted forest covers for biodiversity and low carbon strategy. We recognize that an appropriate level of carbon pricing is necessary to enhance the prospects of REDD-plus in carbon stocking, and more vigorously promote the clean development mechanism.

We are creating a climate change basket fund to receive and allocate multiple financial resources for implementing suitable climate change adaptation and mitigation measures with equal emphasis on both. We call for an effective regime of transfer of affordable and appropriate technologies and their application.

Our future lies in remaining a low carbon society for which we want to progressively reduce the use of fossil fuels and replace the biomass-based energy use by renewable and alternative sources of energy such as hydropower, solar and wind.

Climate change is pushing additional people into poverty negating all efforts of poverty eradication in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) like Nepal, because of their over dependence on rain-fed agriculture, widespread deprivation and weak infrastructures. Nepal calls for increased attention to enhanced financing from industrialized countries and international mechanisms to ensure economic growth and energy security in LDCs.

In conclusion, we can no longer afford to live in mere rhetoric. Commitments must be translated into concrete actions based on the accepted principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, equity and respective capability. Given the enormity of environmental challenges and severity of climate change crisis, it is time to recognize grave threats in this interdependent and interconnected world, demonstrate bold leadership, and develop a comprehensive plan to galvanize grassroots movement along with international actions by global partners to build a binding climate change agreement by 2015 for climate solutions.

Thank you!












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